I recall how the military systematically destroyed the Students Union and the Academic Staff Union of the Nigerian Universities in late seventies after the famous “ALI MUST GO” saga, little did I know that this grand design would later be amplified and used by the democratically governments that followed.

The success of the industrial action organised by the Academic Staff Union of the Nigerian University threatened the attempts by the Military dictatorship to impose and perpetuate itself in governance.

The boycotts did not go down well with the Military Junta.
The military adopted various strategies to deal with the associations that emerged during the struggle for political independence.

In his book “Student Power in Nigeria (1956-1980).” Comrade Ebenezer Babatope gave an authentic public account of “Ali must go” saga, which is not the intention of this article to dwelt on.

The Nigerian Labour Union also suffered similar treatment under junta. It was proscribed at least on two occasions all in the guise to whittle down the powers of the unions and render them prostate.

The ability of the trade unions to call for mass industrial action has been checkmated by various court rulings, decrees and legislations that has reduced their capacities to nothing but toothless bulldogs.

The politicians haven realised the enormous power of the labour unions to garner popular support and engineer civil dis obedience , ensured that the unions are check mated and controlled.

The Civilian Governors have in there various states ensured entry in to the top echelon of the major unions are manned by their cronies.

This was easily facilitated by the fact that most of the union leaders that vied for elective offices in the labour unions are drawn from the pool of officers from the state civil service.

This opportunity became so convenient for the state governors to manipulate the process by ensuring only their candidates win elections in to the union executive offices.

They do so by hand picking, sponsoring, funding and planting their cronies and made sure they win the guided elections with the help of other cohesive agencies of the state who are ready to intimidate, cajole and ensure compliance with their sponsors wish.

That is why today State governments are owing workers months of salary, pensions and allowance arrears un challenged.

The Union leaders have abdicated their responsibilities to the workers because they no longer decide their fates as leaders.

Their loyalty has shifted to the state, as the state now decides their tenure for as long as they remain in check.

While the governors are continuously subverting and whittling down the capacities of the labour associations, they are on the hand strengthening their association under the Governors Forum knowing fully well the enormous advantages of operating under a united umbrella.

They do so through tripartite arrangements of Nigerian Governors Forum, the Sub – Regional Governors Forum and the Political Parties Governors Forum, so that you can not escape their fangs.

If one takes a closer look at our nascent democracy and the challenges we are facing one could easily blame it squarely on the gangsterism attitude of the governors facilitated by omnipresent structures of the Governors forum.

Today no body can win any election in to any office in Nigeria without contemplating the enormous powers wielded by the forum.

They decide who becomes the Presidential Candidates for their party, who emerges to be the candidates for the Senate and House representatives, who takes over from them as the governors of the States.

They anoint members of the state houses of assembly and appoint chairmen and councillors of the local governments un impeded.

The party machineries at the national, state and local levels are not shielded from the octopus cluster of Mafioso forum.

The Nigerian President may be seen to be “Executive” and have absolute power, but real power of the state lies with the governors.

Their immunity from prosecution until they leave office breeds all sorts of impediments to the rule of law and good governance.

This gangsterism did stop at the states but it is also being wholly imported in to hallow red chambers of the national assembly. Very soon the total membership of the red chamber would be taken over ex governors and that would complete the full “gangsterisation of the Nigerian political system”

Sadly, enough the process of amending the Nigeria constitution is also in favour of the State Governors as the states houses of assembly must endorse any changes to the constitution and with the way the states assemblies are being controlled nothing progressive would come out of them.

This being the case the national assembly can not do anything under the current arrangements provided by the constitution to remedy the conundrum.

The crafters of the Nigerian Constitution did not envisage this quagmire. They were rather interested in ensuring that there were checks and balances in the system.

They also did not envisage that any particular group will exploit the lacuna in the constitution for their benefits.

The clause giving the governors protection from unnecessary litigations, were meant to ensure free flow in governance but it has become one the albatross of the 1979 constitution as amended.

In view of the foregoing how far can we go from here? Your guess is as good as mine.

What are our options, how can we get out of this quagmire and save our nascent democracy from the gangsters?


I recall the day when leisurely worked in to the lecture theatre during my Master programme in the University, on the board there was a writing I did not pay much attention.

I took my seat and noticed my mates were gossiping to one another, when I looked up to the board again, I saw this

It was then I figured out why my colleques were murmuring.
My initial reaction was why would the Professor ask such a question.
But since it was a senior class anything could be anticipated.
Soon the lecturer appeared and decided that we should brain storm on what was written on the board.

The class came up with several prepositions, which the lecturer reluctantly accepted.
But since the Professor, had his own answers to the question, he shared it with the class. It was very simplistic but to some extent more plausible than what we suggested.

I went home that day still reminiscing why should the lecturer ask this question, more so when I was not convinced with answers he gave.

The Professor argued that in a country where one would be appointed by Radio and Television announcement and suddenly dismissed by the same medium is not good for the country.
It erodes confidence in governance and breeds criminality.

The Professor elucidated further by saying that each time when these appointments were made, the appointees in most cases were not contacted, and no reason was also given for their removals.

He further agued that by the time the appointees, finished working on their blue print, ready to start work, suddenly, when they reach home in the evening after close of the office, there was an announcement on the Television that he or she has been removed from the office.

The next day another rascal would be appointed in the same manner. He descends on his predecessors savings and embezzle the whole funds.

Consequently, the money did not benefit the society, and it did not benefit the original person who wanted to use the funds for the good of the society.
The Professor, then asked why should one be honest in such a society?

Many of us left the class unconvinced with the Professor’s answer.

Twenty seven years (27) since I walked out of that lecture theatre my mind kept popping up the same question, each time I reflected on how I could make my society better.

But my passion, patriotism, pride and nationalistic fervour be clouded my thinking and I never contemplated any answer beyond what the Professor offered.

Some of my mates who were perhaps more wiser or got the gist and headed to the advice took care of themselves while it lasted.

But those that choose to be honest and played the game by rules and regulations are now walloping in misery and abject poverty perhaps now lamenting how could the Country they served diligently would now desert them in their hour of needs.

It is 37 years since l left that class, now with the benefit of hindsight, I can truly answer my lecturer correctly.

Having spent 35 years of meritorious in the service of my dear country. I now realised the Professor was philosophical in both the question and answers he gave.

Some of the salient issues the Professor did not tell us were, how could one be honest in a country?

1. Where the government does not pay its employees a living wage;

2. Where wages and pensions are unequal among its employees;

3. Where the government does not respect it senior citizens;

4. Where the pension of its former employees are not paid as at when due and when they are paid, the stipends does not support live in retirement;

5. Where hard work, honesty and diligence does not attract reward but misery;

6. Where corrupt public officials are hero worshiped and respected
7. Where National merit awards are given to the bad and the ugly because they can purchase it;

8. Where good name is only given to the opulent, who continue to live on government resources even when they are no longer in service;

9. Where the rule of law is not respected and applied selectively;

10. Where bad governance is prevalent in all strata of governments;

11. Where nepotism is the whole mark for recruitment in to public offices;

12. Where recruitments in to the political class are based on cronyism;

13. Where the security of lives and properties are not guaranteed.

14. Where all basic infrastructures that makes lives meaningful are failing or have failed.

15. Where chocking hyper inflation in the cost of living keep rising by the day,

16. Where lack of good roads, decay in the educational and health care has reached a pitiful level.

17. Where hyper increase in the cost of electricity, school fees, petrol and food stuff continue to increase un abated;

18. Where in security, wanton destruction of lives and properties are increasing by the day, with greater sophistication and tenor.

The irony of all these, this is a country blessed with enormous resources by nature but has allowed some few privileged members of the society to corner its resources through corrupt practices, there by living the larger society in penury, abject poverty and hopelessness.

The question to ask now therefore is not, “ it is criminal to be honest in a corrupt society” as the Professor asked 27 years ago, but rather it should be, “it is criminal not to be criminal in an un just society”?

What are your take on this, may be we would possibly find answers to the anomie of the circle of injustice arresting our development as a nation.


Stop complaining.

Very touching message.
A beautiful post ……….from one mother to another mother

Forwaded as received ….

There were days when My home used to be filled with laughter, arguments, fights, jokes and loads of mischief.

Books used to be strewn all over the show. Pens and books all over, and clothes messing the rooms, thrown on the beds.

I used to shout at them to tidy up their mess.

In the morning:

One will wake up and say :
Mama I can’t find a certain book.

And the other will say : I can’t find my perfume,

And one will say : Mama where’s my homework.

And another : Mama I forgot to complete my homework.

Everyone used to ask about their lost possessions. And I will say, but take care of your stuff, be responsible, you have to grow up.

And today I stand at the doorway of the room. The beds are empty. All the cupboards have only a few pieces of clothes in them. And what remains is the smell of perfume that lingers in the air.

Everyone had a special smell. So I take in the smell of their perfume for maybe it will fill the empty ache in my heart.

All I have now is the memory of their laughs and their mischief and their warm hugs.

Today my house is clean and organized and everything is in its place, and it is calm and peaceful. But it is like a desert with no life in it. Do not become angry with your kids about the mess.

Every time they come to visit and they spend time with us, when they are ready to leave. They pull their bags and it is as if they tug my heart along with it.

They close the door behind them and then I stand still and think of the many times I shouted them to close the doors.

Here I am today, closing my own doors. Nobody opens it besides me. Each one gone to a different city or a different country. All left to find their own path in life.

They have grown up and I wished that they could stay with me forever.

Oh! God….. Take care of them & all other children wherever they may be, for you are their guide and their protector …and always keep them happy.
If yr children are still in d stage that u need to talk & talk before they could get things done in the house, pls. cherish & endure it with joy, don’t nag, they will soon leave yr home for you, remember they were not there at the beginning of yr marriage. Now that they are around, make them happy. 😀😀😀
Dedicated to all mothers and fathers.


Three friends had an accident in a car and became unconscious. A stranger got to the scene and wanted to call for help. He had no phone. ​There were six mobile phones in the accident car but all had password on them​.
They all died as a result….!

A pregnant lady collapsed at home with her little daughter. The little girl had no idea of what was happening but saw her mother gasping for air. ​She picked her mother’s phone to call her Daddy but there was a password on the phone​.
She lost her life…..!

Whose fault?

​My advice is this.​
You are too precious than the information you are securing on your phone.

Only put password on your WhatsApp, Text messages, Facebook, files, etc and leave the call side free. You may one day save your life or the life of your loved ones.

​The password on your phone can be your death warrant.​

Think twice.

A message worth spreading…..creating awareness is real HUMANITY than sympathising or emphathising on the situation….


The following is an excerpt from the Daily Trust.interview with Gen. John Shagaya, a former Minister of Internal Affairs. Hr shares deep insight into the issues dispassionately. I thought to share perchance you might gain.some needed understanding of the real issues.
“We must understand the dimension of the kind of crisis we are facing through the movement of herdsmen either migration, if I will call it that. This is because anybody of my age will know that in the part of northern Nigeria where we come from there is an annual migration of what Ghanaians later modified as trans-human migrant Fulanis. In Langtang for example, you know the dedicated routes of the particular movement every year running from Wase through Garkawa through Yelwa through Shendam all the way to the south. We know when they move down south and up north. And if for any reason the migrant Fulani have to be in any place for a week or more, they will send a delegation maybe because they have some weak ones among them or women who may likely deliver. No quarrel. So we were brought up with that understanding. In the 50’s when we were in primary school, there was this big radio which we used to carry when our parents went out. We will go to the Fulani routes and sit under the tree and when the Fulani women are passing with cow milk, we will say ‘look, these people are tasty’ we will switch off the radio and say the people inside the radio are tasty and the Fulani women will be happy to give us milk so that they people can keep talking. So that was the kind of peaceful things that we knew that is why I am advising that we have to be very careful.
“In this current dimension in migration, there are three things involved. The first is that there is desert encroachment. With this and with the drying of Lake Chad which used to accommodate quite a lot of them, the Cameroonian authorities had blocked the source. So, it means more numbers would have to trample in an attempt to find within the Benue and Niger trough for feeding. It requires a very serious planning. With the experiences that things were changing, Mrs Mary Lar and Prof. Jibril Aminu came up with the programme of Nomadic Fulani Education and Mary made her PhD with it. In that study, if we do understand it, we could create some kind of a habitable stopping area for the migrant Fulanis on their migration routes. Today, it is nice for somebody to call it colony. But they were stopping in places when they were moving, it was never given a big English name, now that you are magnifying the name, you are magnifying the problem.
“The second dimension is what happened in 1984 after the ‘Ghana Must Go’ exercise. Between 1984/85, what we are witnessing today took place in Sierra Leon, Ghana, Benin Republic and Togo. They decided that all the migrating Fulanis must leave and that was where the word trans-human came from. They gave a marching order to all the Fulanis and their cows saying they were Nigerian Fulanis. So, today in Ghana, you find ranching existing only, you don’t find migrant Fulanis. They came to Nigeria and I had left the Military Secretary’s office and taken over the command of 9 Brigade. I was sent to establish tents, receive them, document them and know where they were going, whether truly they would settle in Nigeria or go to Mali or wherever they came from. They were treated nice by the administration at the time. There is a tripartite point between Togo- Nigeria and Benin Republic, very close to Kamba. That area of Kamba running all the way down to Kainji through Babana through Kayama, Digidiru pearl, very rich, beautiful area along the River Niger. So we received them and they were spread there for months. While government was deciding on what to do, they all left in their groupings. Some went back through their normal route of migration. The next thing government said is that there should be a leadership within the Fulanis, hence the encouragement of the registration of Miyetti Allah Cattle Breeders Association. I signed the certificate.
“The intention of government then was to say; if we were faced with any minor problem, there should be a leadership that government can hold. But today, they themselves have broken into various factions and the migrant Fulanis have refused to have anything to do with local Fulani and that is part of the problem. We have to study these things well before we start condemning ourselves, they have to be taken into confidence in the discussions and that was the comment I made to the Governor of Benue State, that there must be a constructive engagement with all the stakeholders, you must know the reason.
The third dimension is arms and banditry and what have you. With the fall of Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi, we must remember that a lot of soldiers of fortunes who came from Chad, Niger and Nigeria who found themselves making good money in Libya. Some of them are still being deported today. Some went as soldiers of fortune to work to defend Libya and when that government was dismantled, some of these very serious weapons fell in the hands of some fellows that moved down to Niger and Chad and mingled with the militants. You find there were already some trained soldiers of fortunes, they had these weapons and I believe it could be part of the build-up that today we face in the North-East. You will notice that within the first few months of this administration, the President had to make some tours of these friendly neighbours in order to know which direction the problem was coming from and not limiting and pretending it was only within Nigeria. That is what has helped us and many people don’t understand that.
“The other dimension could be the politicisation of the issue by whichever ethnic group and I think a lot of propaganda has to be carried out by government. Nigerians have to start seeing certain national problems as a problem of the country and not a problem of one religion or a problem of Buhari because he is a Fulani man and a Fulani man entered a farm. We have to outgrow that, after all, down in the South-East, South-South where kidnapping became an industry, it wasn’t done along religious line and yet there are governors there who come from some of these communities. So why don’t we go round there and say it is this community that is perpetrating it because they come from this governor or that governor’s area is shielding these people. It is not a problem. But if it happens in the North then it is a Hausa Muslim or Christian issue, I think those are issues that we must outgrow. ”
This has shared more light to earlier my write up the General was a participant in an earlier efforts to solve the problem.


Now that the statistics has been reeled out from all the contending sides on the Benue massacre triggered by un couched press statement by the General Secretary of the Christian Association and other Leaders of thought. It will be repetitive to restate the whole positions again.
I believe what needs to be heard about the whole saga must have said, internalised and digested by anyone who cares to follow the National disgrace ditched out to the public as an effort to provide solution to the senseless killings and destructions of properties going on unabated across the country.

If you belong to Fulani stock which incidentally I now found myself to be one according the new definition of who is a Hausa-Fulani.

I pity President Buhari a Fulani man from Daura, with whom we all stand accused for complicity in the massacre that took place in Benue.

If you are Northern Muslim whether or not a Fulani Man you have been labelled a Hausa-Fulani and must be seen as a murderous person.

If you are Northern Minority Christian regardless from which State you come from your are now branded as a Middle Belter. You are also seen as one of those being oppressed by the rampaging Hausa-Fulani Herdsmen supported by their kinsmen in power. This is the sad situations we found ourselves today.

The political elites, the religious bigots, the publicity seekers, the ill informed and the functionally educated groups, all have had their swipes at each other, bitterly calling one another names all in their efforts of show that they care for this country.

But in all these they fell short of offering any concrete solutions to the problems.

They only succeeded in utilizing the blame game in order to serve their open and hidden agenda.

Regardless of how they feel and how they want to define the situations here are some of the facts they wouldn’t want us to know.

The Fulani-Herdsmen, Farmer conflicts are not something that started today, it has been with us for generations. But was managed carefully and intelligently by successive governments from colonial period to date. Until recently when the political elites and the religious bigots for their parochial reasons allowed things to generate to this un fortunate level.

I grew up in small village in Yobe not far away from the plains of river Gongola and because of the opportunities offered by the river I know very early how this Natures gift became a source of conflict between the farmers who needed the plains for on season and off season farming.

The Fulani-Herdsmen also needed the pasture to graze their animals and water for them same purpose.
But because our grand parents new that both settlers and Fulani Herdsmen have a right to this natural gift and because both are citizen of this country, that because one is settled while other remains pastoral does make them less important or less Nigerian then the other. They worked out compromises and created windows for them to exist with less conflicts.

Secondly, the conflicts between the Herdsmen and Settled Famers increased phenomenally for a variety of reasons, the elites are know this and here are some reasons for lack of space.

1. The fragmentation of the society and the greed for accumulation of wealth has broken the communal bond that held the society together as a result of this we are no longer our brothers keepers;

2. Traditionally in most Northern states government created route path and grazing reserves for the pastoralist but over period time due urbanization and increased economic capacities of the farmers, the “ Burtolis” or path ways and grazing reserves that were neglected by states were taken over as farms;

3. If one knows the life pattern of the Fulani Herdsman, it revolves around the cattle. He moves around the country seeking for green pastures seasonally, any threat to this for him is the end of the world;

4. Owing to dwindling rainfall in most part of the North as a result of climate change, the drying up of most small streams, rivers earth dams and shrinking of the Lake Chad, combined with the insecurity and insurgency of Boko Haram in the North East sub region, disrupted pattern of movement of the Herdsmen to beyond the Niger, that is why we are experiencing increased clashes.

5. The mediation mechanism that was in place to handle conflicts between the Farmers and the Herdsmen that were hitherto managed by traditional rulers now taken over the states and local government is either non existent or lack the effectiveness, then it was under the traditional rulers who had developed a fraternal relationships with Herdsmen;

6. In consistent policies and lack of political will by the Northern Governors to tackle issues relating of the pastoralists exacerbated the conflict;

These are some the silent issues the political elites and their cohorts did not want us to know, rather the matter is made to look like a conflict between Islam and Christianity. The tribal bigots also cashed on this to further their political ambitions.

To emphasize the sensivity of the Herdsmen issue the former Governor General of Nigeria Sir, Frederick Lord Lugard gave his portrait of a Fulani Man thus;

“The Fulani people are ascetic, kind and generous BUT Never fight a war (hot or cold) with the Fulani because they have:-

1. No rules of engagement(they just hit again and again)

2. No POW’s (they don’t take prisoners)

3. No mercy (once they pick you out as the enemy)

4. No fighting fatigue (they are forever fit and prepared, due to their lifestyle)

5. No need for adequate provisions and permanent abode (they live on very little and sleep in the wilderness)

6. No end to hostilities (they fight to finish)

7. No ignorance of terrain and location ( their lifestyle makes everyone of them a human GPS )

8. No deterrence due to casualties (they are strategically distributed all over West and Central Africa, and highly mobile)

9. No need for tranquillity (they have no permanent settlements which need peace to thrive).”

10. No fear of consequences.
This position support what our grand parents told us when were young, never engage in fight with a Fulani Man they never forgive disputes even on social matters between families. are transmitted through generations and they take revenge even it take hundreds of years.

Any nation that does not learn from its history is bound to fail. Enough of this senseless and unfortunate loss of human lives and properties. This must not be allowed to continue those that feel they are benefitting from it must know that posterity will not on their side.

Governments at all must take the issue of the Farmer- Herdsmen seriously. The Northern Governors must use their umbrella organization to come with up with lasting solution to the problem.
Individual States enacting laws to deal with the situation is just scratching the surface of problem.

To holistically deal with the problems and have lasting solution we need to understand the history, character and lifestyle of the actors involved.

Any solution that does not deal with the real issues, would only remain a stop gap measure created to take care of the current situations waiting for the next cycle of violence to occu

Finally, I wish to commiserate with all the families that lost their loved ones in the regrettable killings and destruction properties.



Free press, freedom of expression, the right to form associations, hold opinions and freely express them are some of the fundamental basic rights  guaranteed under the United Nation Charter on human rights. Which was adopted by the Nigeria constitution. 

It is also the bedrock upon which liberal democracy derived its power.  

According to Lipset, for liberal democracy to thrive and flourish in a given society there must be the prevalence  of the following; 

1,  High level of literacy in that society,

2. Absence of hunger and  mass poverty,

3. Rule of law,

4. Good governance 

5. Actors in the political arena must play politics by the rule of game;

Where these rights are absent or deliberately curtailed,  trampled or denied liberal democracy may not flourish and thrive in such a  society.

If the State through its apparatus operate in gestapo style to stifle or deny its citizen these fundamental basic rights the government in power may be tilting toward dictatorship and anarchy. 

Gradually, the Nigerian State is moving towards  these tendencies. The Government zero tolerance to constructive criticism on issues relating to governance is becoming so alarming and disturbing. 

If some faceless agents of the state, interpret issues not based on the rule of law and good governance, but defines issues on the basis of  “them versus Us”.  When relationships are reduced to those  with us are “good” and deserve the protection of the State. while those who hold contrary views are our enemies, they must be cajoled to submission ,  labelled and punished. 

If citizens blindly follow their leaders even when they were wrong on issues and are ready to defend them for their selfish, religious, political, and subterranean reasons that society can not progress. 

 I have no choice but agree with Professor Soyinka, when he referred to some segment of our society as the “Mumu’s” of  the internet. 

He posited that the opportunities provided  by the social media for society to participate in governance has given rise to “new group of journalist” who  write all sorts of junks  regardless of its consequences on the society.

These group would write salacious articles defame, libel and  attack any counter views with vigour and intensity in defence of their perceived leaders, even when their rights as citizens are continuously being eroded and denied.

Worst still they often do so without understanding  the import of the discourse  they are commenting on or fighting for. 

In a presidential debate between Mr. Nelson Mandela and Fredrick W. Clark  of South Africa. Mr Mandela said “the essence of government is to provide security, housing, reduce mass poverty, provide infrastructure and good governance” not just defending the few who already are at upper level strata of the  society.  

Amazingly, when  government which is suppose to improve the lives of its citizens becomes enmeshed in dubious  blame game, that government has nothing to offer to its citizens. 

Especially, when the strategy of the blame game theory was  designed to collectively hoodwink our collective psyche, to internalise that everything that is  bad in the system is  the fault of their predecessors, whom they accuse of plundering  our common wealth, through corrupt practices. 

 It is an ordinarily accepted norm for the  government  of the day to pass on its failures   to turn the table round on its predecessors, when the government realise it lacks the capacity, vision and carefully tailored programmes to convince the population there would be light at the end of tunnel. 

The best option to adopts is the blame game theory.

 These failures funnels the society to became restive and turn against its leaders no matter how much they love the  actor (s) in the game.  

if the “good work” of the government does not translate in to providing the basic human needs of the society, despondency, rebellion and agitations for change becomes more pronounced.

Corruption is bad and it must be condemn in  all aspects. It also true it stifles development, but the world has also seen some corrupt nations that have turned the table round through visionary leadership, commitment, patriotism and pride. 

They did so by creating hope, exemplary leadership, transparency, accountability and trust. 

It did so by changing the way its national budget is being crafted,  by showing respect for human rights, institutionalization of due diligence and due process, selfless leadership, respect for the rule of law and good governance. It demonstrated clearly where they were and where they want to be, not business as usual. 

They try to build trust  and openness and empathy so that the citizenry will identify with its programmes.

But not in the manner the corruption crusade is being carried out in our country. Which is selective and most cases it ends on the pages of news papers, without corresponding  sanctions being applied on the corrupt.

The corrupt freely roam the streets, give lectures, represent us at international events, enjoying  their loots, complicating our issues,  hero worshipped by the gullible members of public, who lack the basic necessities of life. 

 Another major worry is the way corruption is being narrowly defined and portrayed to mean only the thievery committed by public officers to corner public fund for their personal gains.

In defining corruption Stephen D. Morris, a professor of politics, writes that “political corruption is the illegitimate use of public power to benefit a private interest.” 

Economist Ian Senior, defines corruption as an action to secretly provide a good or a service to a third party so that he or she can influence certain actions which benefit the corrupt, a third party, or both in which the corrupt agent has authority.” 

Daniel Kaufmann, from the World Bank, extends the concept to include ‘legal corruption’ in which power is abused within the confines of the law, as those with power often have the ability to make laws for their protection. 

The effect of corruption in infrastructure is to increase costs and construction time, lower the quality and decrease the benefit.”

Corruption can occur on different scales. Corruption ranges from small favours between a small number of people petty corruption, to corruption that affects the government on a large scale, grand corruption, and corruption that is so prevalent that it is part of the everyday structure of society, including corruption as one of the symptoms of organized crime.

When we reduce corruption to only thievery of public funds or labelling or using the blame game, in order to deal with your perceived  political opponents,  by gaging  or stopping them from participating freely in the political discourse,  the crusade towards the elimination of corruption  or at least minimizing its occurrences will at best remain selective, and it would not yield the desired benefits. 

In other words  to identify some as corrupt, while others as innocent in spite of the fact that the thievery that made others corrupt is still going on unabated. By  protecting some corrupt officials because  they are part of the cabal, in spite of the public out cry against them, means  something is seriously wrong with our fight against corruption. 

While I was preparing to put this article together three fundamental un intended things happened which I want to share with you. 

Firstly,  a friend munched to me audio recording of BBC   Hausa service interview granted by the former Governor of Jigawa State Sule Lamido, who himself is on bail for alleged corrupt practices in which he succinctly interpreted the Nigeria situation.

 He said  “that the Government that is crying foul that the PDP is  corrupt,  is a creation of the corrupt people who left the PDP.” 

By implication he means it is the corrupt wealth of those who decamped from the PDP that facilitated the electoral victory of the APC, which means the government  too can not purge itself of corruption. click the link below to hear him

Secondly, some few weeks ago after my frustrations with the system I asked the followers of this platform to suggest to me a country that is corruption free so that I will immigrate. This thought was recently shared by Rev. Kukah when he was frustrated by certain happening in the country, that would form the subject of my next article. 

To date no single country has been suggested to me. While some people tried to suggest some less corrupt countries. But  they could not find an absolutely non corrupt society to recommend for me. 

They finally advised me not to be “Andrew.” By this it simply means no society is corruption free but rather corruption is measured based on its prevalence  in the society.  

I did so deliberately  because I knew there would be none but just to amplify how badly we are handling the fight against corruption.

So I decided to stay and keep talking might be one day some one would care to listen.

Thirdly, I wrote an article on this medium demanding that the former NSA Dasuki should be allowed to have his day in court so that the Nation would know exactly what happened. 

I also said he should not be denied his right to bail. I made this call after four  courts of competent jurisdiction granted him bail, but was  denied by the state to exercise his rights on the pretext he would jump  bail. I find this assumption laughable. 

While other tried to use the Boko Haram insurgency sentiment to justify their dislike for the article. 

Nigeria is a sovereign country with all the apparatus of the state that could be deployed  to protect the  lives and property of the citizens. 

If after 47 years of independence we could not put our acts together and tackle simple things like people jumping bail, then the least we could is not to wash our dirty linens in the public by showing in competence. 

To my amazement also most of the people who commented on my article played to the gallery, incentivised  by sentiments of the killing perpetuated Boko Haram. They refused to look deep down and understand the real import of my article.

 I also lost four of my first cousin during insurgency, but choose to show compassion because my religion preaches it . 

I also wanted to know the real   truth and inner working of the NSA Office and why is it that it must always  be a retired General to head that office. 

In America where we fashioned our democracy according to their models allows civilians to head such offices,  after all in democracy all institutions are expected to subject themselves to  Civilian control. 

So the Dasuki’s case provides us with the opportunity to know all these and the only place where we would know the truth is in the court. where he would be subjected to cross examination by lawyers. The cabals know the implication of allowing him to talk in open court.

 Dasuki did not create Boko Haram, he was merely a foolish pawn used by the power that created him, most of whom are now going around enjoying their spoils while he languishes in jail. 

We also have the school of thought that the government needed time to in order to correct the wrongs done by the previous administration. This could be true, but when the government presented its self to the Nigerian electorates seeking for their mandate, it did so on the grounds it has superior programmes to tackle our problems as a nation.

 It is almost three years down the line since it came to power, its actions has not built confidence in the Nigerian people to believe that there would be that change they promised.

The thievery of the public funds continued with ferocity, in security and wanton destruction of human  lives are on the rise, abduction and human trafficking unabated, abuse of court ruling, violation of human rights and extra judicial are still rampant.

Mal- administration, incompetence, bad governance, lack of visionary leadership and rule of law is still prevalent in all the strata of government at all levels. 

It would soon be another cycle of campaigns and grand lies, the electorates have right to raise their concerns. Allow me to use a Hausa proverb which says “an indication of a good Friday manifest itself from Thursday”

When a leader plunders the goodwill of his base by calling them as impatient, turning a deaf ear to their sources of discomfort, treats them with disdain, and  lack of human face, he is bound to witness some hues and cries and discontent from the society about the way he governs.

 This government came in to power through  popular support and in order to maintain its popular support it must change the way it governs. 

The human ability to withstand pressure is limited, its ability for blind support may be strong but it can quickly wane, once it perceive some threats that are likely to challenge their essence and make them unable to fulfil their basic needs.  

I therefore call on this government to rethink and change the way it is governing as its base is thinning and rapidly. “A stitch in time saves nine”.